Overcoming Adversities and Becoming a Leader: The Larry Pino Story

This groundbreaking leadership research by has received extensive endorsements and enthusiastic reviews from well-known prominent business, political, and academic leaders who either participated in the study or reviewed the research findings. You will discover the proven success habits and secrets of people who, in spite of difficult or life threatening challenges shaped their own destiny to become successful, effective leaders. The full results of this research will be presented in the upcoming book by Dr. Howard Edward Haller titled “Leadership: View from the Shoulders of Giants.”

The nine initial prominent successful leaders who overcame adversity that were interviewed included: Dr. Tony Bonanzino, U.S. Senator Orrin Hatch, Monzer Hourani, U.S. Senator Daniel Inouye, Dr. John Malone, Larry Pino, U.S. Army Major General Sid Shachnow, Dr. Blenda Wilson, and Zig Ziglar.

The data from the above nine research participants was materially augmented by seven other successful leaders who overcame adversity including: Jack Canfield, William Draper III, Mark Victor Hansen, J. Terrence Lanni, Angelo Mozilo, Dr. Nido Qubein, and Dr. John Sperling.

Additionally, five internationally known and respected leadership scholars offered their reviews of the leadership research findings including: Dr. Ken Blanchard, Jim Kouzes, Dr. John Kotter, Dr. Paul Stoltz, and Dr. Meg Wheatley.

This is a short biography of one of the sixteen principal participants who generously contributed their time and insight for this important research into the phenomenon of how prominent successful leaders overcome adversity and obstacles. This is Larry Pino’s story:

Larry Pino “grew up moving every three years” because his “father was in the [U.S.] Air Force.” In 1973 he graduated from University of Notre Dame; he then received his J.D. from New York University Law School in 1976. After becoming a young lawyer, he “struggled to build his law practice for several years.”

One of the first adversity or challenge in his adult life “was the complete failure of my first and only campaign to run for political office”:

“I probably could write the book on how not to run a successful campaign, because I made every mistake under the sun. During the course of that campaign, that if I had just simply stayed home and never met a soul, I would have gotten more votes than if I had actually actively campaigned, which I did, for four months.”

He went further to say, “As a matter of fact, the write-in candidate would have done a better job than I did at getting votes out.” He “suffered a terrible loss beyond the defeat at the polls.”

Next, Pino “tried several business ventures.” One of the early businesses in which “I swung hard was when I created was a firm called ‘Crepes to Go.'” Of that venture, Pino said, “I probably made every mistake under the sun, and it turned out to be an absolute disaster, the only business that I ever really, just totally botched, from beginning to end.” Larry then added “Now, out of that emerged a mess, emerged lawsuits, emerged a failure, I didn’t declare bankruptcy, but I lost a ton of money, hard feelings, broken friendships, just a whole bunch of stuff.”

Larry “settled down to focus on building [his] law practice.” Once he “had accumulated some money practicing law and had been very successful selling other people’s seminars,” Pino “started another business selling my own seminar, which unfortunately failed and wiped me out financially.” Out of desperation Pino “turned to the new format of ‘infomercials’ as [his] primary advertising method.” Pino said, “This strategic change in marketing [or advertising] materially turned this business around, creating a profitable company.”

Pino in addition owning the successful American Cash Flow seminar business, Larry “purchased the assets of several businesses with consolidated annual sales of about $8 million and then morphed them into a very successful enterprise development and management firm — Dynetech Corporation.” Pino, as Chairman and CEO, has built “Dynetech Corporation into a strong and vibrant enterprise development and management firm, which is a process provider.” Larry has successfully overcome various obstacles and “as an entrepreneur has started or managed more than 45 successful businesses.” In 2004, “Inc.” magazine named his firm the 71st fastest growing privately held firm on their Inc. 500 list.” He is married to Janet Horvath-Pino and they have two sons and a young daughter.

Copyright 2006 © Howard Edward Haller, Ph.D.

Overcoming Adversities and Becoming a Leader: The Monzer Hourani Story

This groundbreaking leadership research by has received extensive endorsements and enthusiastic reviews from well-known prominent business, political, and academic leaders who either participated in the study or reviewed the research findings. You will discover the proven success habits and secrets of people who, in spite of difficult or life threatening challenges shaped their own destiny to become successful, effective leaders. The full results of this research will be presented in the upcoming book by Dr. Howard Edward Haller titled “Leadership: View from the Shoulders of Giants.”

The nine initial prominent successful leaders who overcame adversity that were interviewed included: Dr. Tony Bonanzino, U.S. Senator Orrin Hatch, Monzer Hourani, U.S. Senator Daniel Inouye, Dr. John Malone, Larry Pino, U.S. Army Major General Sid Shachnow, Dr. Blenda Wilson, and Zig Ziglar.

The data from the above nine research participants was materially augmented by seven other successful leaders who overcame adversity including: Jack Canfield, William Draper III, Mark Victor Hansen, J. Terrence Lanni, Angelo Mozilo, Dr. Nido Qubein, and Dr. John Sperling.

Additionally, five internationally known and respected leadership scholars offered their reviews of the leadership research findings including: Dr. Ken Blanchard, Jim Kouzes, Dr. John Kotter, Dr. Paul Stoltz, and Dr. Meg Wheatley.

This is a short biography of one of the principal participants who generously contributed their time and insight for this important research into the phenomenon of how prominent successful leaders overcome adversity and obstacles. This is Monzer Hourani’s story:

Monzer Hourani was born in what was then Palestine, in 1944. He shared that “we are a Lebanese Christian family, from southern Lebanon. We’ve been there for ages. Our family was a major land owner in Palestine . . . . but when Israel became a state, we were forced out of Israel.” The Hourani family returned to southern Lebanon to rebuild their lives and try to rebuild their fortune.

Unfortunately, civil war, which began in Lebanon in the late 1950s and continued for years, would devastate Lebanon in general and the Hourani family in particular. Monzer commented that “starting in 1958 there was a civil war in Lebanon. My mother was killed on my fourteenth birthday, right in front of me. Unfortunate thing happened, so, it’s very tragic in my opinion.” During the civil war, he did not know for weeks whether his family had survived the various battles.

Monzer said, “I was offered a scholarship to go to Russia, to a major university, in physics, but I refused it. I really wanted to come to the U.S., because I liked the west, in fact, I liked John Wayne.” He applied and was admitted to the University of Texas in Austin. He spoke primarily French with very limited English. At the University of Texas “they had a French professor and a physics professor to do the exams.” Monzer arrived in the U.S. in 1965, studied at the University of Texas, in Austin and “graduated in 1969 with a degree in Architecture and a second degree in Structural Engineering, with two degrees.”

Monzer Hourani is the founder, chairman, and Chief Executive Officer of Medistar, a Real Estate Investment Trust specializing in the building and development of hospitals and integrated medical office buildings. I initially interviewed Monzer during a two-day visit with him at his headquarters and at his home, in a suburb of Houston, Texas. We have also exchanged follow-up telephone calls since the in-person interviews.

In Houston, Monzer developed large commercial real estate projects in the late 1970s. He had successfully negotiated with both Lebanese and European investors to back him in major real estate projects in Houston. He described being caught in the major real estate recession in Houston in the 1980s. According to Monzer, “The recession was more like a depression, and many developers went broke.”

The banks that had provided Monzer’s construction loans failed and he could not get the loans that he needed to complete the buildings that he already had under construction. Monzer had personally signed for these loans. The foreign investors told Monzer, “Don’t worry about it.” And then not only did they not help, but they demanded their money back.

These events caused Monzer a major business and financial problem. “During all this time, my partners in the middle of all this, my foreign partners, asked for all their money back.” He worked hard to turn around the various projects and was successful, in spite of adversity and obstacles. Then he added, “I paid them [the investors] back.”

The Resolution Trust Corporation was established by the U.S. Congress to resolve problems with Savings and Loans, as well as Banks. According to Monzer, the RTC not only refused the remaining loan funds, but also wanted Monzer to immediately pay off his loans on the uncompleted projects.

Monzer had “offered my personal real estate and investment lands as additional collateral to the RTC” and asked them to continue to fund his loans. “My land was taken by the RTC, then sold at bargain prices to their friends in less than arms-length transactions,” leaving Monzer with a deficit still owed to the RTC. He had to battle “the Resolution Trust Corporation, which was full of ignorance, stupidity, and graft, in my opinion.”
His land was taken and sold to others and Monzer was left with debt. He was then sued for over a quarter of a billion dollars.

Monzer’s lawyers advised him to file bankruptcy, but he paid off his debt without doing so. Monzer said, “In spite of literally living in hell as a developer, I kept my word.”

In the 1990s, Monzer rebuilt his real estate development business. His firm has “built tens of millions of square feet of hospitals, high technology-integrated medical office buildings, and large office buildings.”

Many of the major medical office building projects in development at that time were for HealthSouth. Accounting irregularities were discovered at HealthSouth which lead to the arrest, but not conviction, of its chairman, Richard Scrushy and the near destruction of HealthSouth, as a firm.

Monzer again faced a major financial crisis. Refinancing by a new financial partner has allowed Monzer and Medistar to continue to grow. Monzer summed up his journey as a leader: “We survived the Houston disaster in real estate. We are a successful Houston developer, which is an endangered species.” Monzer Hourani and his entire team at Medistar are working daily to serve the medical office building development and state-of-the-art hospital construction needs of the medical community throughout the entire United States.

Copyright 2006 © Howard Edward Haller, Ph.D.

House Estate Tax Compromise is Uncertain in the Senate

The measure approved last week by the US House of Representatives that would eliminate the estate tax for all but the wealthiest families faces an uncertain future in the Senate.

The Permanent Estate Tax Relief Act of 2006 was drafted by Chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee Bill Thomas (R- Calif). It was passed through the house by a bipartisan vote of 269-156 on Thursday of last week.

Thomas says that the bill would give Americans “permanency and certainty for their estate tax planning.” However, he admitted that the Senate vote may be tough.

“I, along with the majority of House members, have voted time after time in a bipartisan manner to fully repeal the estate tax,” said Thomas. “So far, those efforts have died in the Senate.”

Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist (R-Tenn) asked Thomas to draft the compromise bill earlier this month. The goal is to grab the 60 Senate votes needed to avoid a Democratic filibuster.

The legislation is reported to eliminate the estate tax for 99.7% of all Americans. It increases the exemption amount to $5 million per person, and will charge a capital gains tax rate for all estates worth between $5 million and $25 million. Estates over $25 million would be charged a tax rate double the capital gains rate. The current capital gains tax rate is 15%.

The bill is designed to unify the estate, gift and generation-skipping transfer tax. The Joint Committee on Taxation has estimated that the bill will cost $283 billion in ten years.

Currently, the estate tax is gradually declining until it is fully eliminated in 2010. In 2011, the tax will return in full force, with an exemption of $1 million per person and a tax rate that tops at 55%.

There is no word as to when the proposals will be before the Senate, though Frist would like to schedule a vote before the summer recess.